(Reblogged from creativesomething)
fastcompany:

Does your morning look like Margaret Thatcher’s, or Ben Franklin’s? These routines might inspire you to create your own.
Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, we all start our day at some point. And we all seem to start it differently.
Some of us hop online to check social media, others dive in to email, still others eat breakfast, exercise, or pack lunches for the kids. There’re a million different ways a morning could go.
Which morning routine might be best?
While there’s probably not an ideal morning routine that fits everyone, we can learn a lot from the morning routines of successful people as well as from the research and inspiration behind starting a morning on the right foot.
I collected a wide range of opinions on how best to start a day, from the scientific to the successful. Here’s the best of what I found—maybe it’ll help you get a little more productivity, creativity, and enjoyment out of your morning.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Does your morning look like Margaret Thatcher’s, or Ben Franklin’s? These routines might inspire you to create your own.

Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, we all start our day at some point. And we all seem to start it differently.

Some of us hop online to check social media, others dive in to email, still others eat breakfast, exercise, or pack lunches for the kids. There’re a million different ways a morning could go.

Which morning routine might be best?

While there’s probably not an ideal morning routine that fits everyone, we can learn a lot from the morning routines of successful people as well as from the research and inspiration behind starting a morning on the right foot.

I collected a wide range of opinions on how best to start a day, from the scientific to the successful. Here’s the best of what I found—maybe it’ll help you get a little more productivity, creativity, and enjoyment out of your morning.

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
As sexy as brainstorming is, with people popping like champagne with ideas, what actually happens is when one person is talking you’re not thinking of your own ideas.
(Reblogged from fastcompany)
(Reblogged from creativesomething)
Those people who say it can’t be done, should get out of the way of those people doing it.
(Reblogged from fastcompany)
fastcompany:

Turns out what doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.
At the age of 23, Alan Lock, a junior officer in the British Royal Navy, began to experience impaired vision. An eye test revealed he had macular degeneration and would be legally blind within a month.
The Royal Navy had no choice but to discharge Lock from his post—one that he had dreamed of since he was a child. Forced to give up on his career, Lock refused to give up on life and set his mind on a new goal and became the first legally blind person to row a boat across the Atlantic Ocean. He later became the first blind person to trek across Antarctica and the first blind person to run the Marathon de Sables in the Sahara. In addition to setting world records, he’s raised thousands of dollars for worthy charities and become a worldwide inspiration.
We all love an amazing comeback story; especially those about someone who recovered from a horrible event that caused them to re-think their entire worldview and purpose and emerged astonishingly successful. Psychologists David B. Feldman and Lee Daniel Kravets call these individuals “supersurvivors.” In their bookSupersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering and Success they argue there are common characteristics of those who are able to turn a traumatic event into a personal success story.
Although the authors are careful to point out they aren’t advocating trauma, they say these individuals are extreme examples of tapping into the resilient nature that lies within all of us. Whether overcoming a traumatic event such as a sudden loss of eyesight or a minor setback such as losing a key client at work, Feldman and Kravets say there are four key traits that make supersurvivors so resilient that we can all learn from:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Turns out what doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.

At the age of 23, Alan Lock, a junior officer in the British Royal Navy, began to experience impaired vision. An eye test revealed he had macular degeneration and would be legally blind within a month.

The Royal Navy had no choice but to discharge Lock from his post—one that he had dreamed of since he was a child. Forced to give up on his career, Lock refused to give up on life and set his mind on a new goal and became the first legally blind person to row a boat across the Atlantic Ocean. He later became the first blind person to trek across Antarctica and the first blind person to run the Marathon de Sables in the Sahara. In addition to setting world records, he’s raised thousands of dollars for worthy charities and become a worldwide inspiration.

We all love an amazing comeback story; especially those about someone who recovered from a horrible event that caused them to re-think their entire worldview and purpose and emerged astonishingly successful. Psychologists David B. Feldman and Lee Daniel Kravets call these individuals “supersurvivors.” In their bookSupersurvivors: The Surprising Link Between Suffering and Success they argue there are common characteristics of those who are able to turn a traumatic event into a personal success story.

Although the authors are careful to point out they aren’t advocating trauma, they say these individuals are extreme examples of tapping into the resilient nature that lies within all of us. Whether overcoming a traumatic event such as a sudden loss of eyesight or a minor setback such as losing a key client at work, Feldman and Kravets say there are four key traits that make supersurvivors so resilient that we can all learn from:

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
fastcompany:

You can unplug the Internet and pull the shades—or you can phone a friend.
You’re reaching the frayed ends of over-caffeinated overtime and if your inbox pings one more time, you might throw your laptop at a wall. If you had the time to read a whole self-help book on being overwhelmed, well, you wouldn’t need it, would you?
A study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology looks at your options for bailing out of a burnout, before the meltdown starts.
Using a psychology model of coping mechanisms called selection, optimization, and compensation, the researchers tested each method with a sample of 294 employees and their supervisors. Only one of these strategies actually worked. But first, a review of their definitions:
Read More>

fastcompany:

You can unplug the Internet and pull the shades—or you can phone a friend.

You’re reaching the frayed ends of over-caffeinated overtime and if your inbox pings one more time, you might throw your laptop at a wall. If you had the time to read a whole self-help book on being overwhelmed, well, you wouldn’t need it, would you?

study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology looks at your options for bailing out of a burnout, before the meltdown starts.

Using a psychology model of coping mechanisms called selection, optimization, and compensation, the researchers tested each method with a sample of 294 employees and their supervisors. Only one of these strategies actually worked. But first, a review of their definitions:

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
(Reblogged from fastcompany)
fastcompany:

We threw down the first “Habits Challenge” gauntlet today—check it out here—on wrangling your inbox using auto-replies. If you’re ready to crush the competition (the competition is yourself), this habit-tracking edition of Free App Friday is for you.
As always, while they’re free now, we can’t guarantee how long they’ll last—so don’t wait too long.
Read More>

fastcompany:

We threw down the first “Habits Challenge” gauntlet today—check it out here—on wrangling your inbox using auto-replies. If you’re ready to crush the competition (the competition is yourself), this habit-tracking edition of Free App Friday is for you.

As always, while they’re free now, we can’t guarantee how long they’ll last—so don’t wait too long.

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
If you want to hire creative thinkers, interview them in pairs, and beware of the over-eager interviewee nodding, bucking, and jiving when you’re trying to tell him or her about your company. That guy’s probably a little slow.
(Reblogged from fastcompany)