fastcompany:

Turn email into less of a chore with templates of responses and save hours every week.
In an age where the workday is seemingly getting longer and longer, every minute counts. So we thought we’d give you some of them back with this week’s productivity hack.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Turn email into less of a chore with templates of responses and save hours every week.

In an age where the workday is seemingly getting longer and longer, every minute counts. So we thought we’d give you some of them back with this week’s productivity hack.

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
fastcompany:

There’s one adjective that’s never used to criticize men, yet it shows up at an alarming rate in women’s performance reviews.
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fastcompany:

There’s one adjective that’s never used to criticize men, yet it shows up at an alarming rate in women’s performance reviews.

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
fastcompany:

Have you ever received an amazing email, one that you’d like to print out and pin to your wall, one that made you grin from ear to ear or slow-clap in appreciation and reverence?
When I come across these gems, I drop them into a “Snippets” folder. I study them, I swoon over them, and I borrow bits and pieces of them to send better email.
Now imagine that every email you send is as great as these occasional all-stars you receive.
Impossible? Not at all.
Worth shooting for? Definitely.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Have you ever received an amazing email, one that you’d like to print out and pin to your wall, one that made you grin from ear to ear or slow-clap in appreciation and reverence?

When I come across these gems, I drop them into a “Snippets” folder. I study them, I swoon over them, and I borrow bits and pieces of them to send better email.

Now imagine that every email you send is as great as these occasional all-stars you receive.

Impossible? Not at all.

Worth shooting for? Definitely.

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
(Reblogged from creativesomething)
fastcompany:

If you don’t want to slam the brakes on your next brainstorming session, avoid these idea-killing phrases.
Ideas are fragile—they’re easily shattered by snubs, smirks, and scorn. And brainstorms are equally delicate. The wrong words at the wrong time bring brainstorming to a screeching halt.
The function of brainstorming has received its share of badmouthing in recent years, often for good cause. And many of those problems stem from statements made before or during brainstorming sessions.
For healthy brainstorming and bountiful ideas, always steer clear of these seven sentences:
Read More>

fastcompany:

If you don’t want to slam the brakes on your next brainstorming session, avoid these idea-killing phrases.

Ideas are fragile—they’re easily shattered by snubs, smirks, and scorn. And brainstorms are equally delicate. The wrong words at the wrong time bring brainstorming to a screeching halt.

The function of brainstorming has received its share of badmouthing in recent years, often for good cause. And many of those problems stem from statements made before or during brainstorming sessions.

For healthy brainstorming and bountiful ideas, always steer clear of these seven sentences:

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)
fastcompany:

The bad news: Our brains are wired to be negative. The good news: Happiness doesn’t mean you have to be naive, just think realistically.
Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could hack into our own brains and rewire them to be happier?
Science has shown we actually can thanks to a phenomenon called experience-dependent neuroplasticity. “It’s a fancy term to say the brain learns from our experiences,” says Rick Hanson, neuropsychologist and author of the bookHardwiring Happiness. “As we understand better and better how this brain works, it gives us more power to change our mind for the better.”
Hanson assures he isn’t just talking new-age mumbo jumbo. “This is not just ‘smell the roses,’” he says. “I am talking about positive neuroplasticity. I am talking about learning. … The brain is changing based on what flows through it.”
Understanding how our brains function can help us better control them. Here are some key takeaways from Hanson on how our brains work when it comes to wiring for happiness:
Read More>

fastcompany:

The bad news: Our brains are wired to be negative. The good news: Happiness doesn’t mean you have to be naive, just think realistically.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could hack into our own brains and rewire them to be happier?

Science has shown we actually can thanks to a phenomenon called experience-dependent neuroplasticity. “It’s a fancy term to say the brain learns from our experiences,” says Rick Hanson, neuropsychologist and author of the bookHardwiring Happiness. “As we understand better and better how this brain works, it gives us more power to change our mind for the better.”

Hanson assures he isn’t just talking new-age mumbo jumbo. “This is not just ‘smell the roses,’” he says. “I am talking about positive neuroplasticity. I am talking about learning. … The brain is changing based on what flows through it.”

Understanding how our brains function can help us better control them. Here are some key takeaways from Hanson on how our brains work when it comes to wiring for happiness:

Read More>

(Reblogged from fastcompany)

creativesomething:

The creative process, illustrated.

(Source: hillergoodspeed)

(Reblogged from creativesomething)
(Reblogged from creativesomething)
(Reblogged from fastcompany)
In the instance of getting an idea, I go act it out on paper — I don’t put it away. I don’t delay, I don’t put off to tomorrow doing what I must do, right now, to find out what my secret self needs, wants, desires with all its heart. And then it speaks, and I have enough brains to get out of the way and listen.
(Reblogged from creativesomething)